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Your Daily Getaway: Armchair Travel Option for Email Subscribers

Some day I’ll visit all the locales mentioned in the tongue-twisting song, “I’ve Been Everywhere.”

I’ve been to a great many of those North American places on my motorcycle, including Fargo, North Dakota, where I ate one of the best Greek meals ever. As a matter of fact, I’ve been to so many beautiful and quirky places that I’ve decided to share them with you in an optional email subscription called the “Daily Getaway.”

Armchair travel option for email subscribers

The Daily Getaway is a picture from my North American travels with a short caption or quote and sometimes a link to learn more about the place or subject. They’re just the right thing to start your day on a positive note. Subscribe right here by checking “Daily Getaway” at the bottom. You can also get an email of each week’s blog posts, if you check that box.

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Seriously, folks, don’t rely on social media to dish up everything I have to offer!

Fun factoids

“I’ve Been Everywhere” isn’t just about North American travel. There are versions for Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain and Ireland and a host of others.

And in case you’re reading this post on your mobile device from bed or the potty, you’re not alone!

Infographic showing the places people check their mobile devices, including bed and the bathroom

About Tamela Rich

Avatar for Tamela Rich
Author Tamela has extensively traveled the U.S. and Canada, delivering her message to Pack Light | Travel Slow | Connect Deep. Her keynotes and workshops include life lessons she has learned through chance encounters on the road.

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